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Art+by+AJ+Dickerson+%2810%29.+Dickerson+is+one+of+Pilot%E2%80%99s+Artists+in+Residence+and+describes+her+process+as+letting+the+art+take+over+her+and+then+opening+her+eyes+when+she%E2%80%99s+finished.
Art by AJ Dickerson (10). Dickerson is one of Pilot’s Artists in Residence and describes her process as letting the art take over her and then opening her eyes when she’s finished.

Art by AJ Dickerson (10). Dickerson is one of Pilot’s Artists in Residence and describes her process as letting the art take over her and then opening her eyes when she’s finished.

AJ Dickerson

AJ Dickerson

Art by AJ Dickerson (10). Dickerson is one of Pilot’s Artists in Residence and describes her process as letting the art take over her and then opening her eyes when she’s finished.

Heidi Budd, Editor-in-Chief

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Despite Increases in Anti-Bullying Efforts, Problem Persists

You walk over to a group talking in a circle but when you get there, no one makes room for you and, when you walk away, you hear them laughing behind you. Your friend won’t stop bringing up that embarrassing story about your ex from Freshman year to everyone. A teacher singles your paper out in front of the entire class as an example of what not to do. You dread coming to school every day out of fear for what those boys will choose to point out on you today. You focus more on conforming to what they are wearing and doing and your learning suffers. But all of this you don’t report because bullying is name calling or punching… this doesn’t count… you should just get over it.
October is Anti-Bullying Awareness Month, and while the conversation of surrounding bullying may appear, to some, to be old news, it is never too early or too late to continue the conversation. Especially when approximately 3.2 million students are victims of bullying each year, and more than one in three victims of bullying (38%) experiences suicidal thoughts or actions.
According to StopBullying.gov, 20% of high-schoolers experience bullying, and those numbers are just reported cases. 37% of just cyberbullying cases alone go unreported and it is much harder to calculate numbers of non-cyber cases of bullying that go unreported.
Over the years, there has been an increase in anti-bullying education efforts in schools with the implementation of organizations like CHADS and Stomp Out Bullying, which studies show have helped to decrease school-related instances of bullying by 25%. However, as much as these programs have helped to reduce some more serious cases of bullying, the problem still persists.
Of a survey conducted of 161 LHS students, 67% say that have witnessed bullying at some point, and 82% feel that Lindbergh has not successfully stopped bullying at the high school. Yet, 60% of LHS students do not feel that Lindbergh has a bullying problem. This disconnect could be due to wide range of factors that affect all of victims, bullies, and bystanders.

Elementary Establishment

Pushing on the playground, taking toys without asking, name-calling, not including others or being excluded from a game – what do all these have in common? While all of these are things many children remember either doing to others or having done to them when they were little, they are all also examples of early bullying.
For student Tyler Bock (11), his past experiences with bullying were those that started at a young age.
“I remember being in Kindergarten. I was on the playground and a group of 2-3 boys came and pushed me down for no reason. This continued for about a year. I was confused but, as a kid, I just let it go,” Bock said.
Studies show that bullying primarily happens in school, with one in three US students saying that they have been bullied at school. However, elementary ‘picking on’ is seldom recognized as so serious an offense as actual bullying, and, hence, with so little intervention, often carries on into later years.
As students grow older and enter middle and high school, the amount, severity, and types of bullying seem to age with them. And at a pinnacle point in students lives where they are maturing and growing into their identities, the ‘immaturity’ of bullying ‘matures’ to cover a broader range of topics and victims.

IT’S JUST A JOKE
Some of the most common forms of bullying that typically go unreported by students are offenses where the bully tries to brush off their actions by saying “it’s just a joke,” and the victim is made to feel as though they are over-reacting.
One such incident happened to Raven Schodl (10), a transgender student at LHS, who describes a time when he was called out by a large group in a setting where the offenders would have considered what they were doing to be ‘just’ a joke.
“I’m a trans man, and it was near the end of the year last year when a group of three guys called me the wrong name on purpose. Then some guys on the bus would taunt me. They would ask me who the man was in my relationship,” Schodl said.

ETHICAL SOLUTIONS
Lindbergh defines bullying as a repeated offense that makes another student feel unsafe. However, sometimes bullying doesn’t always make a student feel ‘unsafe’ and is not always ‘repeated.’ In Schodl’s case, he says his experiences with bullying did not necessarily make him feel unsafe, rather that they were simply hurtful and bothersome. Students like Londynn Tesch (10) have endured similar situations and feel that Lindbergh needs to reevaluate the way it defines bullying for the sake of its students.
“I feel that Lindbergh’s bullying education is not very accurate. They define bullying as being repetitive and usually involving an incident like beating someone up or insulting somebody. But bullying can also be social exclusion, and I feel that Lindbergh doesn’t really acknowledge that. And I just feel that it’s not very extensive – they always say report it but they don’t do anything once you do report it,” Tesch said.
In most classroom settings, students are taught to, when it comes to bullying, report report report – this is not new. However, more students than just Tesch feel that their reporting goes unnoticed. Schodl describes similar treatment that he received when reporting his experience with bullying.
“I didn’t see their faces, but I went to the office to report [the incident], and I was told ‘choose what you think is actually important,’ which felt degrading for an adult, especially an educated adult, to tell me this. I feel as though they should stand up everyone, even if they don’t know who did it,” Schodl said.
Schodl and Tesch are not the only ones who felt as though they struck out when attempting to seek help from an adult. Madilynn Brda (10) is a student in special education at LHS who describes her past experiences with bullying at LHS.
“A mean person kept coming close to me and following me around. They also touched my back which made me feel uncomfortable and got in my way so I couldn’t move. Also someone called me names and said mean things to me out of the blue for no reason. I wish that someone would have taken care of me and told the other person that it’s not OK to do that to someone,” Brda said.
For students in situations like Brda’s, seeking help can be especially difficult. Students in special education are told not to ‘tattle’ twice as often as students not enrolled in special education.
76% of LHS students say that they are familiar with Lindbergh’s bullying policy and resources, yet with victims of bullying voicing distaste or distrust in Lindbergh’s efforts, clearly changes need to be made. And LHS’s Administration is speaking out to try and improve students’ knowledge of the resources available to them and their peers.
According to Priscilla Frost (Assistant Principal), one of LHS’s most crucial resources is the bullying report form, located in every office on campus and used to anonymously report bullying that students either witness or experience firsthand. Frost adds that once the form is turned in, the district has 10 days to complete an “investigation,” which can include looking at surveillance footage or social media accounts, interviewing involved parties, and more.
Other than administrator’s abilities, the age-old instruction of ‘report report report’ still rings true. And, coupled with that, the bystander also plays a key role. When bystanders intervene, bullying incidences stop within 10 seconds 57% of the time.
“These people make fun of me because they don’t think they’ll have to deal with the repercussions or get in trouble. They think that they’re in the majority because they all group up. But I think as soon as they realize they are outnumbered by people who don’t agree with them, they’ll start to recognize that what they’re doing isn’t right,” Schodl said.
And to leave no one excluded, Joan Hereford (Science Department, CHADS Advisor), offers some advice to bullies and those with the potential to become bullies (even unintentionally).
“What students should think about is not the intention of the bully, but how the person who is receiving that would feel. In other words, if someone claims, ‘I’m just making a joke,’ but what they’re saying is hurtful or mean, it is still bullying,”Hereford said.

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